5 Good Reasons for Leaving a Job On Your Own Terms

good reasons for leaving a jobMost of us have dreamed about walking away from our job at one time or another. Even if you have a great salary, great benefits and fun coworkers, your job can be a drag if you’re not passionate about it.

So you always think of reasons to stay and avoid the prospect of financial crisis. Here are 5 good reasons for leaving a job on your own terms.

You can have a plan in place.

Maybe you’re worried about losing your job. Maybe you aren’t. But the truth is, even the best employees can get fired or laid off.

You can get a new boss who’s out for your blood. Maybe your company’s being restructured. Maybe technology has made you obsolete. Or maybe the next financial crisis has come along.

You don’t want to sit around and wait for this to happen. If you make a plan and end your corporate career on your own terms, you can have a clear idea of how you’ll earn money. Wait until you get fired and you’ll just end up at the unemployment office. Leaving a job on your own terms is the best way to avoid getting laid off.

You can leave the stress behind.

You already know corporate jobs can be wearing. And if you’ve already been at it for decades, the impact of long-term stress on your health is probably adding up. Employers spend $300B/year in stress related health care for workers.

If you decide to end your corporate career and pursue your own business, you can leave a lot of work-related stress behind you. You’ll have no looming deadlines, no boss watching over you. You can work how you want, when you want, and where you want. Maintaining health and peace of mind are very good reasons for leaving a job. to And you can start building real capital to safeguard yourself against financial crisis.

You don’t have to burn bridges.

If you do eventually get fired or laid off, it’s safe to say you’re not going to be on good terms with your old boss and coworkers anymore. But if you quit your job on your own terms, you don’t have to burn bridges, and you avoid getting laid off.

Sure, walking out with no notice isn’t going to work. But if you give notice, talk to your boss frankly, and show respect for the company as you leave, your career can end on a good note. This might be important if you like your boss and want to keep friends. But it’s also valuable to have a network of allies in the corporate world for when you go into business on your own.

You can start pursuing your dreams.

Only 13% of people around the world actually like going to work. But most of them will never quit, because they can’t.

But you can. If you have passion about a business idea, you can take the leap to make it happen. You don’t have to keep suffering at a job that doesn’t inspire you.

Anyone (I mean it, anyone) in the US with an education and a great business idea can become an entrepreneur. Smart entrepreneurship and investments are the best ways to ride out a financial crisis.

You might inspire others.

I know a lot of corporate workers, especially later in their careers, worry about what their colleagues would think of them if they walked away from the job. You have a nice salary and a pension you’ve been paying into for decades, so why leave?

But if you make the leap, and actually find happiness doing something else, it’s actually more likely to inspire others. Rather than criticize you, they’ll admire you, and may even decide to leave the corporate world behind themselves.

Did you think these were good reasons for leaving a job? Don’t wait for the next financial crisis. Make the leap and start pursuing your dreams now.

 

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2 Responses to 5 Good Reasons for Leaving a Job On Your Own Terms

  1. Stuart February 10, 2017 at 1:50 PM #

    Owning a business isn’t for everyone. There are a lot of folks that don’t have the passion or hustle to pull it off, but I agree with you that everyone should take mitigating steps to stay in control of their life. For those who prefer to go the employee route, I strongly suggest joining a professional association and building your network. When your spidey sense starts kicking in that there may be danger lurking in your job, you can easily reach out to your network and find another job faster and with less effort than the traditional job hunting path. Participating in a professional association is a small commitment and only takes 1-2 hours a month.

  2. Ian Bond February 11, 2017 at 1:44 AM #

    I couldn’t agree more, but network with your peers’ bosses and don’t hang with your buddies. They can’t hire you!

    I emphasize entrepreneurship as the barriers to entry as so low today and most people don’t know. Consulting and freelancing are a good start fro any professional and you just manage your self.

    In my upcoming course I have an entire section on tactics for extending your career runway. This is the best way to maximize income while building additional income streams.

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